review RULES OF THE WILD

Francesca lives in Italy and Kenya. In this book she tries to paint a picture of the white tribe in kenya, that is the white world of the white Kenyans and their groupies. She describes the group as a group of baboons, with their own laws, their own shops, their own habits, their own views on wildlife and nature in Kenya.

The main character of this book (from Italy!) has been driven by love to go to Kenya. But that relationship hits the rocks and sinks. But in the meantime she has already found someone else. He is a white Kenyan, running luxury sfaris for rich and very rich clients. She also meets another white Kenyan man, who is a journalist. With both men she has a special relationship.

Most of her time she spennds in one of the houses of one of the men in Karen, a posh suburb in Nairobi where many white folks live. In Karen she has contact with white girlfriends, attends white dinnerparties, flies the open spaces with white bushpilots to beautiful spots (that are not white 😉 . Ever so few the main character tries tries to get into contact with other Kenyans, Kenyans who are not members of the white tribe, but these contact are not on the same level. Often it personel she tries to get into contact with.  ,

Near the end of the book she picks up a job, yes, ofcourse for a white man who just arrived from London. He works in the advertisingbranche.

I do not know if it has been the writer’s intention, but to me this is a sad, very sad book. A small group of isolated baboons, who hardly realise in what country they do live. In a word of thanks I come across sme well known names of white Kenyans.  Three Kenyans recieve thanks for keeping up with her. I got the impression that she refers to ‘her’ housemaids (?). For as a non-working woman you need people to do the work that you are not willing to do, otherwise you miss out on all the nice things in life.

Francesca Marciano – Rules of the Wild – 1998 

 

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Published by

semper

I enjoy reading about Africa. New books. Old books. By African writers. By non-African writers. Novel. History. Travel. Biographies. Autobiographies. Politics. Colonialism. Poetry.

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