Al-Shabaab’s Nairobi attack is a reminder that tit-for-tat terror never succeeds


Another vicious attack has hit the Kenyan capital Nairobi. The West Mall attack took place six years ago. Now another crowded place has become a place of death and blood and traumatized people. The writer Mukoma wa Ngugu gives his opinion.

On the rise – and cost – of the African novel in English


When I think of the quest for African literature in one of the local languages of the African soil, the name of Ngugi wa Thiongo springs to my mind. He started writing in his own vernecular. In this article by his son Mukoma the name of Chinua Achebe is mentioned, that was a bit of … Continue reading On the rise – and cost – of the African novel in English

Mukoma wa Ngugi: what decolonizing the mind means today


It has become a topic that is linked with the Kenyan writer Ngugi wa Thiongo. The relation between literature, language and colonialism. The topic has not been finished yet. His son Mukoma writes in this article about it. He harks back to the days that his father discovered the need to write in his mother … Continue reading Mukoma wa Ngugi: what decolonizing the mind means today

The Mabati-Cornell KiSwahili Prize for African literature 2017 reading


It is a serious prize. It is about the Mabati-Cornell Prize for African Literature 2017. The prizes have been announced, people turned up, writers, and those who judged. Looking at the pictures and the video’s it seems to be that the audience was limited to a few people, unfortunately. But be your own judge and look … Continue reading The Mabati-Cornell KiSwahili Prize for African literature 2017 reading

writing in african languages


Mukoma wa Thiong’o writes about the use of African languages in the art of writing. But this process starts in an earlier stage. What to think about the use of languages at primary and secondary school? What will be the language of instruction? Will other languages be allowed at the playground? 

the immortals: the ngugis


Their return to Kenya has not gone unnoticed. In front the writer Ngugi was Thiong’o who celebrates 50 years of Weep not child. He is accompanied by his children who are not foreign to the pen and words and books themselves.